French history in literature and film

Rough Notes ~

 

The Scarlet Pimpernel – takes place during the French Revolution


Events in History at the Time the Novel Was Written
“THE GUILLOTINE” section is very interesting!
Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/the-scarlet-pimpernel-events-in-history-at-the-time-the-novel-was-written#ixzz23lwrEp00

 

Les Misérables, is an 1862 French novel by author Victor Hugo that is widely considered one of the greatest novels of the nineteenth century. The title is variously translated from the French as The Miserable, The Wretched, The Poor Ones, The Wretched Poor, or The Victims. Beginning in 1815 and culminating in the 1832 June Rebellion, the novel follows the lives and interactions of several characters, focusing on the struggles of ex-convict Jean Valjean and his experience of redemption.[1]

Examining the nature of law and grace, the novel elaborates upon the history of France, architecture of Paris, politics, moral philosophy, antimonarchism, justice, religion, and the types and nature of romantic and familial love. The story is historical fiction because it contains factual and historic events.

A Tale of Two Cities – Charles Dickens – narrates aspects of a major historical event, the French Revolution.

 

MOVIES about the French Revolution

La Marseillaise
“Les Misérables”
“Tale of Two Cities”

The French Revolution: Liberal Ideals

*La Marseillaise 1938 [In French] 135 mins.
Dir. Jean Renoir
The story of the French Revolution from the perspective of the Marseilles volunteers.

*Danton 1982 [in French]
Dir. Andrzej Wajda, with Gerard Depardieu.
This film by a polish director caused a sensation in France for its perceived criticism of the Revolution.

La Nuit de Varennes 1982 [In French]
Dir. Ettore Scola, With Marcello Mastroianni, Hanna Schygulla, Harvey Keitel

La Révolution française 1989
Dir. Robert Enrico, With Klaus Maria Brandauer, Jane Seymour, Sam Neill
Dramatizes the revolution from 1789 through 1794.

 

Brotherhood of the Wolf – the story follows actual events that plagued the peaceful rural province of Gevaudan, events that are still to this day unsolved.

Cyrano de Bergerac (1990)
ARTICLE about the real Cyrano http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyrano_de_Bergerac_%28writer%29

In 1897, the French poet Edmond Rostand published a play, Cyrano de Bergerac, on the subject of Cyrano’s life. This play, by far Rostand’s most successful work, concentrates on Cyrano’s love for the beautiful Roxane, whom he is obliged to woo on behalf of a more conventionally handsome but less articulate friend, Christian de Neuvillette.

The play has been adapted for cinema several times, most recently in 1990 with Gerard Depardieu in the title role. That 1990 version’s dialogue is in French with subtitles written by Anthony Burgess in rhymed couplets, mirroring the form of the dialogue in the original play. The most famous film version in English is the 1950 film, with José Ferrer in the title role, a performance for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor.

The Count of Monte Cristo Background

by Alexandre Dumas

The Three Musketeers is such a novel. In any case, The Count of Monte Cristo, also written with a team of collaborators, was written at the same period as these novels, which had a distinct didactic purpose. It was Dumas goal to teach the French people their historical heritage. The plots of the D’Artagnan romances are thus restricted to actual historical events and the characters reflect actual historical personages. The Count of Monte Cristo is only loosely based in fact, and thus does not fit the category of the D’Artagnan romances. History forms a mere backdrop to the plot. Dumas thus had much more freedom to create the imaginative plot and to develop the characters’ role. Does this mean that The Count of Monte Cristo is not didactic in nature? Most likely the novel was created as a relief from the genre of the D’Artagnan romances, however , this is not to say that one cannot find historical events within the novel. Historical and social values are still contained within the work, though they are reduced to the backdrop. The work covers the period of French History from 1814-1838.

http://www.gradesaver.com/the-count-of-monte-cristo/study-guide/about/

 

Alexandre Dumas wrote numerous stories and historical chronicles of high adventure. They included the following:

  • Othon l’archer
  • Captain Pamphile (Le Capitaine Pamphile, 1839)
  • The Fencing Master (Le Maître d’armes, 1840)
  • Castle Eppstein; The Specter Mother (Chateau d’Eppstein; Albine, 1843)
  • Georges (1843): The protagonist of this novel is a man of mixed race, a rare allusion to Dumas’ own African ancestry.
  • The Conspirators (Le chevalier d’Harmental, 1843) later adapted by Paul Ferrier into an opera
  • Ascanio (1843?); Written in collaboration with Paul Meurice (1820–1905): France – History – Francis I, 1515–1547 – Fiction.
  • Louis XIV and His Century (Louis XIV et son siècle, 1844)
  • The Nutcracker (Histoire d’un casse-noisette, 1844): a revision of Hoffmann‘s story The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, later set by the composer [Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky|Tchaikovsky]] to music for a ballet
  • the D’Artagnan Romances:
    • The Three Musketeers (Les Trois Mousquetaires, 1844)
    • Twenty Years After (Vingt ans après, 1845)
    • The Vicomte de Bragelonne, sometimes called “Ten Years Later”, (Le Vicomte de Bragelonne, ou Dix ans plus tard, 1847): When published in English, it was usually split into three parts: The Vicomte de Bragelonne, Louise de la Valliere, and The Man in the Iron Mask, of which the last part is the best known. (A third sequel, The Son of Porthos, 1883 (a.k.a. The Death of Aramis) was published under the name of Alexandre Dumas; however, the real author was Paul Mahalin.)
  • The Corsican Brothers (Les Frères Corses, 1844)
  • The Count of Monte Cristo (Le Comte de Monte-Cristo, 1845–1846)
  • The Regent’s Daughter (Une Fille du régent, 1845)
  • The Two Dianas (Les Deux Diane, 1846)
  • the Valois romances
  • the Marie Antoinette romances:
    • Joseph Balsamo (Mémoires d’un médecin: Joseph Balsamo, 1846–1848) (a.k.a. Memoirs of a Physician, Cagliostro, Madame Dubarry, The Countess Dubarry, or The Elixir of Life)(Joseph Balsamo is about 1000 pages long, and is usually published in two volumes in English translations: Vol 1. Joseph Balsamo and Vol 2. Memoirs of a Physician.)
    • The Queen’s Necklace (Le Collier de la Reine, 1849–1850)
    • Ange Pitou (1853) (a.k.a. Storming the Bastille or Six Years Later)
    • The Countess de Charny (La Comtesse de Charny, 1853–1855) (a.k.a. Andrée de Taverney, or The Mesmerist’s Victim)
    • Le Chevalier de Maison-Rouge (1845) (a.k.a. The Knight of the Red House, or The Knight of Maison-Rouge)
  • The Black Tulip (La Tulipe noire, 1850)
  • Olympe de Cleves (Olympe de Cleves, 1851-2)
  • The Page of the Duke of Savoy (Catherine Blum, 1853-4)
  • The Mohicans of Paris (Les Mohicans de Paris, 1854)
  • The Wolf-Leader (Le Meneur de loups, 1857)
  • the Sainte-Hermine trilogy:
    • The Companions of Jehu (Les Compagnons de Jehu, 1857)
    • The Whites and the Blues (Les Blancs et les Bleus, 1867)
    • The Knight of Sainte-Hermine (Le Chevalier de Sainte-Hermine, 1869): This nearly completed novel was his last major work; it was being published serially. It was lost until a rediscovery in 1990 by the Dumas scholar Claude Schopp. He edited it and wrote two-and a half chapters to complete it, based on the notes of Dumas. Published in 2005 in France, it quickly became a bestseller.
  • Pietro Monaco sua moglie Maria Oliverio e i loro complici, 1864)
  • Robin Hood (Robin Hood le proscrit, 1863)
  • The Count of Moret; The Red Sphinx; or, Richelieu and his rivals (Le Comte de Moret; Le Sphinx Rouge, 1865–1866)
  • The Women’s War (La Guerre des Femmes): follows Baron des Canolles, a naive Gascon soldier who falls in love with two women.

MOVIE LIST
http://www.vernonjohns.org/snuffy1186/france.HTML

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